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All information gathered first-hand, since 1995



The center of the old village is grouped around a square with arcades. Some of the village's vaulted passages are low enough and long enough to pass as tunnels, if you're sharp-eyed enough to find them. The village has narrow little streets, nicely paved, and ancient houses of old stone and colorful Provencal pastels. There are enough winding streets to merit a wander-around, some dropping down the steep hillside to the lowest part of the village.

A smartly paved square, Place de l'Hotel de Ville, has the town hall on one side and the church opposite, with sundial and stained-glass window [Photo-10]. On this wall of the church is a plaque with a Roman inscription. The church is the early-16th-century Ste-Marie-Madeleine.

Cafés are an important part of Provencal villages. Le Broc has one café, Chez Marie-Lluce et Max, under the arcades in the center of the village [Photo-04].

On our most recent visit (December 2010) the main square was filled with a Christmas village, including pottery stands, hand-made children's furniture and toys, and some very good gourmet possibilites, such as plates of oysters or smoked salmon, with a side of wine.


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History of Le Broc

Name

First record, 13th century Castrum de Broco. Etymology is from brec, meaning raised place — the castle and village of the Dos-Fraires were perched just to the north.

Medieval: The current commune was formed in the 15th century, from the fusion of the Medieval communes of St-Pierre-d'Oliva and Dos-Fraires. The castle was captured in 1593 by a band of Routiers.


Olive Oil Mills

We have 1 olive oil mill listed for Le Broc (click).

Dining

On a December Saturday we found two restaurants open, the La Vaute (where we dined) and La Mangiuca(in the arcades by the main square). Another restaurant, L'Estragon is located on the main road, just above the old center.


Nearby Places


Nearby Hotels

Nearby Places

Nearby Hotels