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All information gathered first-hand, since 1995



Our "Trinité" chapel doesn't appear on any road maps and isn't marked with any signs or other notices. We've called it "Trinité" because of the small locality sign nearby at the edge of the road [Photo 2].

The little chapel does appear as a simple pink square on the detailed IGN hiking map, but still took some searching to find it. The building is a simple little thing sitting in the trees, and doesn't appear to be a chapel to passers-by. There is a farm house on the far side of the chapel, making it appear to the casual observer to be a normal little ruin. The chapel is on private (but unposted) property, so treat the place with respect (which we're sure you would be doing anyway).

The beauty of the place, for us, is the surprising transformation when you walk around the building. Ruins of ancient stone walls remain at the edges of the chapel, with large stone blocks, the forms of subtle arches and little niches in the walls.

The side door was open when we were there, allowing us to enter and experience the wonderful patterns of light and shadow in the long, narrow room [Photo 6]. Even with the side door closed, though, you can see in through the wndow openings of the front door [Photo 5].

You can find more photos of the Notre Dame de Trinite chapel on Provence in 6 by 6, under Callas.

The callas-provence.com website states that the Chapelle de la Trinité was first mentioned in the 11th century.


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